How to Know You Need Gaming Addiction Help

    need-help-with-gaming-addiction.jpgIf you’re searching for gaming addiction help, you must be thinking something isn’t right. But you're probably not convinced there's really a problem or that you need help.

    The biggest question that trips people up is — Can gaming really be an addiction? Rather than ask that question, how about just asking, is it a problem? It doesn’t have to meet the clinical definition of an addiction for it to be a problem for you. Just be open to the possibility that maybe you could benefit from some gaming addiction help.

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    Negative Impact of Gaming Addiction

    How can gaming be bad? It's just a hobby, and doesn't even hurt anybody. In my counseling I've heard couples describe it as an activity that they both enjoy and share a common interest. All good. One couple played while in the same room together, but they were also playing different massively multi-player online role-playing games (MMORPG), so even though they were in the same room and doing the same activity, they were completely disengaged from each other, and really much more involved with the other players in their games than each other.

    Here are a few other ways gaming can become a problem and how you will know you need some gaming addiction help.

    Gaming is hurting your relationship. It's not uncommon to hear partners having problems complain in couples counseling that the other partner is always on their cell phone when at home. Often guys are busy playing online games on their phones, which leaves their partner and kids feeling less important.

    He doesn't clean or cook and he is always doing things he knows irritates me. He doesn't move from playing video games and finds every excuse not to want to spend time with me. I can't take it anymore and I don't want to leave him but if I can't get him to meet me half way I won't be able to take it anymore."-Dominique

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    Gaming is negatively impacting your health. One of the objectives of game designers is to increase the amount of time people play them (some don't even have an ending). It's easy to spend hours playing and not even realize it. As a result, other important things like sleep, eating, and personal hygiene get neglected.

    He can stay up all night long and talk to his gamer friends." -Jasmin

    Gaming is impeding your functioning. You're not getting done the things you want or need to get done. This could mean not completing work tasks, school assignments, honey 'to do' list items, etc. Or maybe it looks something like this next guy and you're not acting like the person you want to be.

    Yesterday our girl was sick, he was so worried about her, he wanted me to take her to the doctor. He missed work so i could have the car. i asked if he wanted to go to the doctor with us, he said no. So i sat 2 hours with our sick girl at the doctors office, and i checked his computer later and he was at home playing video games. Saddens me." -Liz

    Help Understanding Why Gaming Becomes an Addiction

    Understandably gaming can be very appealing. There's an intoxicating thrill that comes with discovering, solving, and succeeding at them. Here are a couple of other reasons why gaming can be addicting to the point of needing help.

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    Their role-playing element is a big reason of why games become addicting. Pretending to be someone else can be exciting. That's one of the things that make movies so appealing. The escape from real-life that this provides can be very intoxicating, especially if you're already unhappy with your life. This can lead you to make gaming more important than your partner or kids.

    He always liked to play video games since the beginning. He told me to tell him of it felt like he was playing too much and he would stop. Here we are years later and I have told him countless times but all he does is get an attitude." -Trisha

    Forming relationships with other players is another thing that makes gaming addicting and a problem requiring help. As you play alongside others and engage in the same adventure together the bond of these relationships can become very strong. I've worked with guys who've cheated on their spouse out of these relationships. One guy found the praise of a fellow female player so much more appealing than the nagging of his wife that it drew him into spending more and more hours gaming, and he timed his game playing when he knew she'd be online too.

    Whenever I try to play video games, she complains to me that video games and relationships don't mix and gives me 2 hour motivational speeches that I need to stop playing games, I need to grow up etc. Maybe she's right. Am I addicted to games and need help?" -Randy

    Admitting You Have an Addiction to Gaming and Need Help

    The first and most important gaming addiction help that every person needs is realizing that it's a problem. I hope you can see yourself somewhere in the above real-life stories and in so doing your denial will begin to break down a little bit. Be on guard against denying that gaming's a problem, and don't over-analyze whether or not you think it is or isn't an addiction -- it just needs to be causing you problems.

    I hope you can recognize and admit it if you're vulnerable to gaming becoming a problem. We all are, but if you're already unhappy, stressed, or bored with your life, you're even more susceptible. Asking for gaming addiction help doesn't make you a bad person, just someone who's struggling keeping life in balance -- and that's something we all struggle with.

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